DOI: 10.5176/2251-1865_CBP17.5

Authors: Katrim Alifa Putrikita and Endah Puspita Sari

Abstract: This study aimed to determine the relationship between cognitiveemotion regulation and anxiety among women in the third trimester of pregnancy. It involved third-trimester pregnant women, aged 18-40 years old in Blora, Indonesia. There were nine hypotheses of nine cognitive-emotion regulation strategies, including relationship of self-blame, other-blame, rumination of focus or thought, catastrophizing, putting into perspective, positive refocusing, positive reappraisal, acceptance, and refocus on planning with anxiety among women in the third trimester of pregnancy. The measurement of this research used two scales. The first scale was Anxiety Scale from Passer and Smith (2007), and the second scale was cognitive-emotion regulation scale modified from CognitiveEmotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) constructed by Garnefski and Kraaij (2007). The Pearson and Spearman analysis was used to analyze the correlation between nine strategies of cognitive-emotion regulation and anxiety. Five cognitive-emotion regulation strategies and anxiety had correlations, which were self-blame (r = .468; p = .003), other blame (r = .436; p = .005), rumination of focus or thought (r = .547; p = .000), catastrophizing (r = .369; p = .021), and putting into perspective (r = .444; p = .005). Meanwhile, four strategies of cognitive-emotion regulation (e.g. positive refocusing, positive reappraisal, acceptance, and refocus on planning) had no correlation with anxiety.

Keywords: anxiety, cognitive-emotion regulation, third trimester of pregnancy, pregnant women

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